Justice in the Workplace: Working to Live of Living to Work?

Justice in the workplace: Working to Live or Living to Work?   ‘The joys and the hopes, the griefs and the anxieties of the men of this age, especially those who are poor or in any way afflicted, these are the joys and hopes, the griefs and anxieties of the followers of Christ. Indeed, nothing genuinely human fails to raise an echo in their hearts.’1 To those of us who perceive the Church as being solely interested in the spiritual realm, these opening words taken from Pope Paul VI’s 1965 encyclical Gaudium et Spes spell out clearly the deep commitment
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2018 ESSAY AND MULTIMEDIA CONTEST -Weaving Bonds of Belonging: Knowing Our Neighbours

Each year the Catholic Diocese of Christchurch Commission for Justice and Peace (CCJP) organises an Essay and Multimedia Contest. The contest invites students from our Catholic Schools in the Diocese to think about Social Issues and exposes them to Catholic Social Teaching. This competition is an initiative of the CCJP and is based on the topic of Caritas 2017 Social Justice Week Suggested Readings and Resources  Compendium of Catholic Social Teaching, Catechism of the Catholic Church, http://www.caritas.org.nz/parishes/social-justice-week/social-justice-week-2017, The CCJP’s publication, DIGNITAS HUMANA, November 2015, www.chchjusticepeace.nz/ Contest Rules  The Contest is open to all Catholic Schools in the Diocese of Christchurch and is
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Water

Water No human, animal or plant can possibly exist without water. Our appreciation of this fact ranges from tending pot-plants on the window sill to advanced space missions exploring extra-terrestrial bodies and their likelihood of supporting life. The Bible, Church prayers, hymns and sacraments are replete with references to water. Water is a metaphor for spiritual nourishment, regeneration and cleansing. The Old Testament speaks of God as the fountain of living water (Jeremiah 2:13) while Jesus stated that “whoever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring
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‘And now… Euthanasia’ Book

Compiled by Michelle Kaufman and published by FLINZ. A comprehensive overview of the history, ethical dilemmas and practical effects of euthanasia and assisted suicide. Written with the NZ context in mind and drawing on experiences and perspectives from both Aotearoa and abroad. This resource explores the moral issues from both the Catholic and humanitarian perspectives. It has the full support of Bishop Patrick Dunn, Bishop of Auckland, and includes his letter of commendation. $15 + GST per copy or $12 +GST for orders of 30 or more. Available at the Catholic Shop, St Mary’s Pro-Cathedral CHCH.
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Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Bill (“the Bill”)

It is the Commission’s view that the Bill adopts a flawed understanding of human rights in an attempt to redefine marriage in such a way that would tear the core meaning away from this most fundamental of institutions. The Bill is based on a spurious understanding of minority rights which now threatens the cornerstone of New Zealand’s societal structure. Not only is the definition of marriage as celebrated since time immemorial under threat, but an incidental consequence of the Bill, once enacted, will surely be that the idea of the importance for society of the indispensable role of a husband
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Refugees – an opportunity to show solidarity

The 1951 United Nations Refugee Convention defined a refugee as someone who “owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality, and is unable to, or owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country.” 1 Interestingly, there is no direct reference in this definition to armed conflict or war, which means that many end up in situations in which their status as refugees may be in limbo. The Catholic Church’s approach widens
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Mental Health in Canterbury

Broken households, broken hearts and broken streets. The Canterbury earthquakes of 2010 and 2011 had dramatic impacts on many aspects of our lives. Perhaps less obvious but no less significant than the damage to our buildings and streets is the breaking of minds. This article explores issues around the state of mental health in Canterbury since the earthquakes and how we should respond in the context of Catholic social teaching (CST). Earthquake related mental illnesses include posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, depression and anger management difficulties. Clinicians note the onset of such illnesses in individuals with no previous histories, as well as recurrences
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